Malus x Domestica

First, a word of thanks. This blog recently passed having 100 followers. It seems wildly improbable to me that the oddities I write have garnered that much interest, but I’m incredibly grateful to everyone who has supported the page or liked a poem I’ve written. Now, enough of all that. Here’s a poem:

Ripened ovaries

Hiding the five elements

Inside of their core

Written as part of the dVerse writing prompt on Apples: https://dversepoets.com/2020/03/03/dverse-poetics-apple/

Published by Shaun Jex

I dabble in an assortment of literary and artistic endeavors. My writing has appeared in Celebrations Magazine, Old School Gamer Magazine, Texas Heritage Magazine, Renaissance Magazine, Cowboy Jamboree Magazine, and other disparate locations.

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8 Comments

      1. I did! I dislike poems I don’t understand. You don’t have to use obscure words and unrecognisable grammar to say something meaningful. The ‘poets’ who think that, IMHO need to go back to school and read some proper poetry.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. When I’m writing for a general audience I like to be as accessible as possible. That said, some of my stranger whims (like writing haiku about pyramidal neurons, human microbiota, or Euclidean geometry) tend to require slightly more specialized language. That may or may not be a failing of the endeavor, but I still enjoy the process of finding poetry in what a lot of folks view as sterile and remote.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. No, that sounds quite valid to me. As long as the strange words actually mean something, why not? Words can be beautiful even when we don’t know what they mean, like a foreign language. What I object to are the smart poems that are written in a deliberately abstruse language just to make the poet appear clever.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. It’s funny to see the star in the apple, as I rarely, if ever, cut them that way. As to the words chosen, whether simple, complex, obscure, or conjured from thin air, poetry is their realm. Happy Poeming!

    Liked by 1 person

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